The Awakening by Kate Chopin

Book-Club

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Rating: ♥ ♥ ♥

This was a book that was picked at our book club for a classic genre.  Via Goodreads – “When first published in 1899, The Awakening shocked readers with its honest treatment of female marital infidelity. Audiences accustomed to the pieties of late Victorian romantic fiction were taken aback by Chopin’s daring portrayal of a woman trapped in a stifling marriage, who seeks and finds passionate physical love outside the confines of her domestic situation.

Aside from its unusually frank treatment of a then-controversial subject, the novel is widely admired today for its literary qualities. Edmund Wilson characterized it as a work “quite uninhibited and beautifully written, which anticipates D. H. Lawrence in its treatment of infidelity.” Although the theme of marital infidelity no longer shocks, few novels have plumbed the psychology of a woman involved in an illicit relationship with the perception, artistry, and honesty that Kate Chopin brought to The Awakening.”

It was a very short story that abruptly ended and left you feeling like there should of been more.  But once the discussion started at book club, we all found that there was more to the book that met the eye which made for interesting perspectives on the matters.

 

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The Child Finder by Rene Denfeld

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Rating: ♥ ♥ ♥

Naomi is Rene Denfeld’s “The Child Finder”. Once herself a missing child, she has become a private investigator specializing in the search for missing children. She has no memory of her own past, only from the moment of her escape and rescue. Sometimes she finds a live child, sometimes remains and sometimes she gets no answers. Her current case involves that of Madison Culver, who went missing three years ago at the age of five while Christmas tree hunting in an Oregon National Forest. Through hard work and countless hours of research and hiking, Naomi may have stumbled upon a clue. The book is told from the point of view of Naomi, Madison (Snow Girl), and Mr. B. The book moves at a fast pace, keeping me engaged so I wanted to keep reading but I just didn’t find it to be a book that I really liked.

And the Trees Crept In by Dawn Kurtagich

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Rating: ♥ ♥ ♥

When Silla and Nori arrive at their aunt’s home, it’s immediately clear that the manor is cursed. The endless creaking of the house at night and the eerie stillness of the woods surrounding them would be enough of a sign, but there are secrets too—questions that Silla can’t ignore: Why does it seem that, ever since they arrived, the trees have been creeping closer? Who is the beautiful boy who’s appeared from the woods? And who is the tall man with no eyes who Nori plays with in the basement at night… a man no one else can see?

The story line was ‘okay’.  I most enjoyed the narrator as I listened to this on audio! It made me giggle at how into the characters she was, along with a few other narrator voices that played other characters as well.  This audio version was even paired with creepy music to go along with the story.  I’d say at least give it a shot on audio for sure, I look forward to seeing what everyone thinks!